World Diabetes Day is the primary global awareness campaign focusing on diabetes mellitus and is held on 14 November each year.[1]

The first thing anyone should know is what type you are. Type 1 and Type 2 are very different and can greatly effect the treatments and medicines used for control. For our selves we are both Type 2. The major difference for us is our bodies produce insulin but it is not used correctly by our bodies. Type 1 produce no insulin. Therefore the regimes and diets should be drastically different. With oral medication and informed dieting you can reverse the process. I’m happy to say my blood work results from last week now show I am no longer diabetic!

We practice low carb dieting, and use both Keto recipes, and a glycemic index. It took a lot of learning and trial to learn what works best for us. My husbands numbers came way down through the use of diet, oral medication and a once weekly injection of medication.

I was diagnosed as a diabetic several years ago. My husband is as well. We’ve learned a great deal about our dieting and health. My best advise is to be an informed patient. I often see and hear a lot of misinformation out there. Everywhere from accredited medical staff, to internet content. If you suffer from this or know someone who does you know what I’m talking about.

Led by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), each World Diabetes Day focuses on a theme related to diabetes; type-2 diabetes is largely preventable and treatable non-communicable disease that is rapidly increasing in numbers worldwide. Type 1 diabetes is not preventable but can be managed with insulin injections.[2] Topics covered have included diabetes and human rights, diabetes and lifestyle, diabetes and obesity, diabetes in the disadvantaged and the vulnerable, and diabetes in children and adolescents. While the campaigns last the whole year, the day itself marks the birthday of Frederick Banting who, along with Charles Best and John James Rickard Macleod, first conceived the idea which led to the discovery of insulin in 1922.[3]

World Diabetes Day was launched in 1991 by the IDF and the World Health Organization (WHO) in response to the rapid rise of diabetes around the world.[2][4]

By 2016, World Diabetes Day was being commemorated by over 230 IDF member associations in more than 160 countries and territories, as well as by other organizations, companies, healthcare professionals, politicians, celebrities, and people living with diabetes and their families.[5] Activities include diabetes screening programmes, radio and television campaigns, sports events and others.